Author Topic: Venom floats  (Read 126 times)

agritech

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Venom floats
« on: December 20, 2018, 08:17:30 PM »
I am a big fan of ice buster floats for ice fishing. Not sure how many or if any others have used them but the line slide is on the bottom of the float which stays under water and does not freeze. I always like to use a lure weight that keeps the top of the float either just above or even with the surface. I have two sizes and seemed to be switching the floats around between the bigger and smaller ones depending on if I was perch/trout fishing or walleye fishing. Anyway I was looking around the other day and came upon Venom floats, they may have been out for a while but I had not seen them. I have order up a half dozen of them as it looks like they are adjustable for different weight lures. The Venom and the Ice Buster are both pencil shaped floats and if weighted correctly offer very little resistance when being pulled under.

Pic is of the ice buster weighted correctly.  Same float in my First Day Post, but this a rig I usually use for walleye but had a small trout lure on, sitting a little high to be most effective.


Walleyes

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Re: Venom floats
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2018, 08:48:20 PM »
I'm not a fan of floats for ice fishing Walleye. I like to go down to bottom often and tap the bottom and stir it up a bit and bring it up slowly. A good percentage of my fish are tagged coming just off bottom slowly. I could see them being effective for Perch or trout maybe.
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agritech

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Re: Venom floats
« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2018, 10:52:01 PM »
I'm not a fan of floats for ice fishing Walleye. I like to go down to bottom often and tap the bottom and stir it up a bit and bring it up slowly. A good percentage of my fish are tagged coming just off bottom slowly. I could see them being effective for Perch or trout maybe.

Banging the bottom can often be the ticket for sure, and often my hook will be set right on the bottom not always suspended above it. I started using them years ago when the kids were younger, I would set the depth and tell them not to set the hook until the float went down seemed to really improve their hookups. They soon learned when it was time to set the hook.  I have been using them ever since. 

OL_JR

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Re: Venom floats
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2018, 12:06:10 AM »
         Interesting, I like the idea of the line side being underneath the ice.  I used to use slip bobbers a lot especially for perch when the bite was lite but kind of moved away from them as it got a bit annoying unless the conditions were optimal (warm), and the ice build up around the float, line, and stopper was manageable.

         I take the whole family out fishing a lot as well and honestly have found the best way to battle a light bite is through a camera where they can actually see the fish inhale the hook.

         They look like something valuable to add to the arsenal for certain situations though, couple questions.  How quick are they to set up? Do they clip on or do you have to run the whole line through?  What do you do with the float when you hook one and are reeling it up?
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agritech

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Re: Venom floats
« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2018, 12:59:03 PM »
         Interesting, I like the idea of the line side being underneath the ice.  I used to use slip bobbers a lot especially for perch when the bite was lite but kind of moved away from them as it got a bit annoying unless the conditions were optimal (warm), and the ice build up around the float, line, and stopper was manageable.

         I take the whole family out fishing a lot as well and honestly have found the best way to battle a light bite is through a camera where they can actually see the fish inhale the hook.

         They look like something valuable to add to the arsenal for certain situations though, couple questions.  How quick are they to set up? Do they clip on or do you have to run the whole line through?  What do you do with the float when you hook one and are reeling it up?

The Venom like the Ice Busters are slip bobbers so the float just slides up the line to your lure.  You can make a small slice in the line loop at the bottom of the float but I always slide the line through. That just assures that it can never come off which is not a big deal in the winter but can be a real PIA in the summer if your anchored. I find them pretty easy to set up. I tie my own knots on the line, slide a small bead on, slide the float on and tie on your hook/lure. I use old fly line backing for the slip bobber knots, it grips well on Fireline or Power Pro or I imagine any of the superlines.  Takes a couple minutes to tie one up.