Author Topic: Is it worth getting a new stock?  (Read 1583 times)

Sonny

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Is it worth getting a new stock?
« on: June 17, 2013, 05:27:49 PM »
So I was out shooting the Norinco coach gun and after a few 3 inch 00 buck loads part of the stock cracked and a piece of wood fell away. :(

I know it's an inexpensive gun but dagnabbit it sure is a lot of fun to shoot. ;D

I have a feeling a new stock will cost to much for this gun.

Thoughts?

btw...3 inch 00 loads make you take notice in this little puppy.

[attachment deleted 180 days old]

JIMMY 808

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Re: Is it worth getting a new stock?
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2013, 05:46:22 PM »
Should be able to fix that I will see if Rman can give you instructions.

Rman

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Re: Is it worth getting a new stock?
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2013, 06:31:19 PM »
Hello Sonny!

Sorry about your stock!  :(

It should be fixable, and more importantly, that action probably needs to be bedded.
When you yank on that trigger, the action is comming back and hitting the wood, and that needs to stop. A bed job will distribute the recoil more evenly, and prevent the action from moving around.

Where are you located?

R.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2013, 06:34:24 PM by Rman »
Dinty Moore is to shooters, like spinach is to Popeye.
Hell of a thing, killing a deer. You take away all he's got, and all he's ever going to have.

walleyes

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Re: Is it worth getting a new stock?
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2013, 06:45:27 PM »
Ouch !!!

Looks like a fun Little gun for sure,, I would be wanting to fix it..

Sonny

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Re: Is it worth getting a new stock?
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2013, 09:12:16 PM »
Hello Sonny!

Sorry about your stock!  :(

It should be fixable, and more importantly, that action probably needs to be bedded.
When you yank on that trigger, the action is comming back and hitting the wood, and that needs to stop. A bed job will distribute the recoil more evenly, and prevent the action from moving around.

Where are you located?

R.

Hey Rman I'm in Hinton but travel to Edmonton quite abit.

Are you a gunsmith and do you really think it's fixable?

JIMMY 808

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Re: Is it worth getting a new stock?
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2013, 09:17:30 PM »
Hey Rman I'm in Hinton but travel to Edmonton quite abit.

Are you a gunsmith and do you really think it's fixable?

It is fixable it is a common problem with browning o/u it is from not bring relived.  There are only two gunsmith is a loaded word lol.

Sonny

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Re: Is it worth getting a new stock?
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2013, 09:41:48 PM »
It is fixable it is a common problem with browning o/u it is from not bring relived.  There are only two gunsmith is a loaded word lol.

Right on..lol

Yeah I don't really "need" this shotty but I would like to get it fixed because it comes with a huge giggle factor. ;D

I have three other shotguns that suits my needs,a Remington 870 express and twin Ithaca 5 shot semi-autos.

One has a 30 inch full choke and the other has a 18.5 inch cyl/bore so I'm good from waterfowl to upland birds to bear defence. ;)

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Rman

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Re: Is it worth getting a new stock?
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2013, 10:32:04 PM »
Hey Rman I'm in Hinton but travel to Edmonton quite abit.

Are you a gunsmith and do you really think it's fixable?

I can fix it. It won't be pretty, but it can be fixed. There will be a line of epoxy between the two pieces of wood, and wherever else the stock needs to be relieved.
Jimmy is right, as this is a common problem with that type of handle/gun combo.
Mail it down if you like, and I can have a look at it.

R.
Dinty Moore is to shooters, like spinach is to Popeye.
Hell of a thing, killing a deer. You take away all he's got, and all he's ever going to have.

Sonny

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Re: Is it worth getting a new stock?
« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2013, 10:39:08 PM »
I can fix it. It won't be pretty, but it can be fixed. There will be a line of epoxy between the two pieces of wood, and wherever else the stock needs to be relieved.
Jimmy is right, as this is a common problem with that type of handle/gun combo.
Mail it down if you like, and I can have a look at it.

R.

Right on.....PM sent. :)